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Book Reviews 02/2016

Crafty Book Review: Upcycled Porch Star from Crafting with Wood Pallets
Mind you, they're not convenient. First, you've got to source them (we have a local shop that's given us permission to pick up wood pallets from them whenever we see them on their loading dock–perhaps there's a store near you that will do the same ...

The Sacred Combe, book review: Oases within you and without you
When Simon Barnes was a boy, his favourite viewing on television was The Adventures of Robin Hood. But it wasn't the daring deeds of Robin and his merry men that captivated him; it was the place where they happened: the Greenwood. For him, the appeal ...

Book review: Bryson finds plenty to love and lament in the U.K.
Bill Bryson has pulled off quite a trick in his decades of travel writing. With every book, he manages to make readers wish they could go for a walk with him, while he secretly wants nothing more than to be left alone. "The Road to Little Dribbling ...

Youth, by Paolo Sorrentino - book review: A hectoring and abstract work full of redundant adjectives
Pauline Kael called them “Come-Dressed-as-the-Sick-Soul-of-Europe Parties”. Those films by Fellini, Resnais or Antonioni which suggest that the listlessness and disillusion of a few privileged characters bespeak a more widespread, continental malaise, ...

Old Man Logan #1
Some of the beats may feel familiar to hardcore comics fans and pop culture geeks, but the book is a solid opening chapter overall. Logan wakes up naked in his own past, much like another metal skeleton'd time traveler. Don't expect an explanation ...

Book review: Serge A. Storm a literary Stooge for Florida
It is just possible that despite — or maybe because of — buffoonish plots, outlandish characters and slapstick comedy, Tim Dorsey's novels may be masquerading for carefully researched history lessons about Florida. Make no mistake, "Coconut Cowboy ...

Book Review: Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
Salt to the Sea is one of the most memorable books I have read in a very long time. Ruta Sepetys tells the story of four teenagers during World War II, each with different backgrounds and intentions, all of whom end up on the Wilhelm Gustloff ...

Book Review: “Native” by Sayed Kashua
Israeli-Palestinian writer Sayed Kashua initially planned to spend a year teaching Hebrew at the University of Illinois before returning to his apartment in Ramat Denya, a Jewish neighborhood in western Jerusalem. But on June 12, 2014, a few ...

Book Review: Monkey business, again
But 15 years after the thunderous success of his Man Booker prize-winning Life of Pi, Yann Martel has risked it again. In that book - which sold more than 7million copies worldwide and was adapted into a film by Ang Lee - he meditated on truth and ...

Book Review: 'Rules for a Knight' by Ethan Hawke
With his little book Rules for a Knight, Hawke shows that knightly virtues such as courage, humility, and honesty very much have a place in modern life, whatever we are doing. Rules for a Knight was written for Hawke's four children. It's a series of ...

A Blizzard, Meth And A Missing Mom Make 'Sweetgirl' A Harrowing Read
Set in a fictional town not far from Mulhauser's home city of Petoskey, Mulhauser's book chronicles Percy's desperate search for the mother whose drug dependency keeps threatening to destroy her family. Percy's trek is, of course, not easy. After a ...

Book review: 'Earnest' by Kristin von Kreisler
Those big brown eyes, that silky-sheened fur, butt-wiggles, even puppy breath was hard to resist. You couldn't decide who picked whom, and it didn't matter: on the day you met your dog, it was forever. But, as in the new book “Earnest” by Kristin von ...

Book Review: Who Built That? Not Obama
Michelle Malkin's book, Who Built That, tells the story of America's unsung and unheralded entrepreneurs who made America what it is today: a land of the American Dream, free market and freedom. She told the story of many of America's innovative ...

Book Review: John Ross, Rebel with a Cause
In 2005, John Ross wrote an article for The Progressive on the massive and ultimately successful resistance to then-Mexican President Vicente Fox's vendetta against a popular leftwing mayor. It began: “There are moments here when civil society comes ...

'Hard Ever After' book review: Only, always, and forever a Hard Ink family
Everyone is helping get the warehouse ready to house their consulting business, as well as enjoying each other's company. This book was a lovely way to get one last glimpse into their lives before we throw ourselves wholeheartedly into the Raven Riders ...

'He Will Be My Ruin' book review: Love, money, and antiques tell a twisted tale
He Will Be My Ruin by K.A. Tucker is a dark and twisted mystery that you should definitely put on your to-read list. If you haven't taken a chance on a book outside your typical fare, we suggest you make an exception for He Will Be My Ruin. Who doesn't ...

Our Shared Shelf January book review “My Life on the Road”
On January 6, British actor and United Nations Women Global Goodwill Ambassador, Emma Watson tweeted that she'd been brainstorming names for a feminist book club, calling to action her nearly 21 million Twitter followers to pitch their ideas. Just a ...

Book Review: Many Yet One? Multiple Religious Belonging
As someone born into an interfaith family, I am attracted to synergy, hybridity, complexity, and convergence. Lately, I see a moment of convergence approaching, when my progressive Jewish communities and my progressive Christian communities might ...

Comic Book Review – Nailbiter #20
Ugh. I had hoped that taking a break from Nailbiter for a few issues would make reading it a little easier, maybe put a fresh perspective on the book. Unfortunately, it didn't. Paradoxically though, this issue does remove a few of the roadblocks that ...

Book Review: The Misfortunes of the Dead, by George Pitcher
George Pitcher is emeritus professor of philosophy at Princeton where he was a member of the philosophy department from 1956-1981. His 1984 article, “The Misfortunes of the Dead,” addresses the question of whether the dead can be harmed. George ...

Book review: Dispossessed in the Name of 'Security'
A new book, edited by Nick Buxton and Ben Hayes, both involved with The Transnational Institute, brings together a thoughtful collection of scholars, journalists and activists to explain the pre-eminence of the military and corporations in shaping the ...

A Writer Straddles Jerusalem's Two Worlds In 'Native'
There are a thousand chapters in Sayed Kashua's new book, Native. A thousand of them (that might be an exaggeration), but my favorite one is called "Anti-Hero" and it begins like this: "'We have to leave the country,' I informed my wife as I went over ...

Book review: The Narrow Door explores friendship in a way that few other memoirs have
I've been having trouble making up my mind about The Narrow Door. It was not all pleasurable to read, although I liked it. I was irritated throughout, although I think it has accomplished something new. My notes, in margins, are all exasperation and ...

And on That Bombshell: Autoblog reviews Top Gear writer's new book
There were a lot of bits I really liked in Porter's book, which is titled "And on That Bombshell: Inside the Madness and Genius of Top Gear." Without giving away the farm, did you know Ben Collins was the first white-suited Stig? Perhaps I should have ...

Review: In 'Better Living Through Criticism,' AO Scott Offers Insight
But if we were looking for an intelligent, informed and often funny account of why we can't live comfortably with criticism (in any of the word's meanings), and can't live without it, either, we need look no further, and shall probably want to read ...

Book Review: Trump: Surviving at the Top (September, 1990)
Editor's note: In this September 24, 1990 article from our magazine archives, Fortune's former director of public relations Gary Belis reviewed Donald Trump's second book, Trump: Surviving at the Top. Trump called Belis's review of his first book “the ...

BOOK REVIEW: 'Queen of Spies: Daphne Park, Britain's Cold War Spy Master'
At the age of 11, Daphne Park was living in a tin-roofed shack with no lights or running water in the British protectorate of Tanganyika when a letter arrived from London that changed her life forever. It was from her aunts, who were offering to ...

Comic Book Review – Paper Girls #5
What does the future Erin Tieng signify for this book? In bits and pieces, this book has been hinting at who Erin is and who will she become for a while now. How else can you explain the wonderfully serene dream with Ronald Reagan a few issues ago ...

Book Review: Wall Street Wars
In 1928, the aircraft manufacturer Boeing was planning an initial public offering of its stock, to be led by the securities affiliate of National City Bank, the predecessor of Citigroup. Overriding the recommendation of one of his investment bankers ...

Book Review: The Madoff Chronicles Bests Its TV Adaptation
In my review of the Madoff miniseries, I complained that the show focused more on Bernie's personal life than on the crimes he committed. Luckily, although the film was adapted from Ross' book, it really bears little resemblance the synergetic slop ...

Teen Book Review Site Launched By Brewster Girl Scout
Check out A Book Banter ! It's a new website was created by Brewster Girl Scout, Jacqueline Carey for her Gold Award project. The online book review website also has library book reviews so teens can find books they want to read categorized by genre, ...

Scouring Brazil For A Celebrated Novelist
The missing writer's daughter, Raquel, isn't exactly thrilled to have Emma Neufeld show up, claiming superior knowledge just because she's intimately familiar with every line of Beatriz Yagoda's books. Raquel has never read them, but she has "no ...

Comic Book Review – Cry Havoc #1
Cry Havok #1 BEHOLD THE MODERN MONSTROSITY. X-Men Legacy writer SIMON SPURRIER and superstar artist RYAN KELLY present fiends, fragility, and firepower in an all-new series, mixing the hard-boiled militaria of Jarhead with the dark folklore of ...

Comic Book Reviews for February 3, 2016
Elsewhere, Dynamite relaunched their Dejah Thoris comic and Image began an important new chapter of The Walking Dead. Scroll down to check out our reviews for these and many other new comics. And be sure to let us know your favorite books this week ...

“HANNIBAL LECTER AND PHILOSOPHY” (Book Review)
Not long ago, a juicy-looking tome entitled HANNIBAL LECTER AND PHILOSOPHY: THE HEART OF THE MATTER landed on my doorstep. Edited by Joseph Westfall, the paperback book holds 268 pages and is part of Open Court Publishing's academic ...

In 'The Lost Time Accidents,' John Wray balances the logical and the ludicrous
It is, in a nutshell, a sweeping historical novel that's also a love story but is rooted in time-travel science fiction and takes on as its subject the meaning of time itself. This is no small endeavor. It's hard not to admire this book, the mass and ...

Book Review: 'The Abyss Surrounds Us'
It is a truth universally acknowledged that the union of sea monsters and pirates makes for a great fantasy novel. “The Abyss Surrounds Us” by Emily Skrutskie confirms this truth. The first of a planned duology, the novel follows Cassandra Leung, a 17 ...

Review: 'West of Eden' — Hollywood Not-So-Confidential
In 1971, Edie Sedgwick, the subject of Jean Stein's last book, died in Santa Barbara of an overdose of alcohol and barbiturates. That same year, Jennifer Jones, one of the principal figures in Ms. Stein's new “West of Eden,” staged a theatrical suicide ...

Book review: When Breath Becomes Air
Kalanithi wrote the book in the 22 months leading up to his death, approaching the task with the same single-minded dedication that he had applied to his medical training. From a young age Kalanithi was fascinated by existential questions and the ...

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Widow'
“The Widow” arrives from England recommended as “twisty psychological suspense” and “an electrifying debut thriller.” It's not either of these. It's more like a jigsaw puzzle. From the get-go you know how the final picture looks: in this case, you soon ...

Book Review: It's. Nice. Outside. by Jim Kokoris
For while on the surface and to its core the book delves into the special bond a family has for Ethan, a young adult son with special needs severe enough to require a lifetime of supervised care, it is also about fathers and daughters and husbands and ...

Confronting Loss While Scaling 'The High Mountains Of Portugal'
Tomas has discovered an ancient diary that sends him on a quest for a lost treasure in the mountains of the book's title, a geographically obscure realm that actually contains no mountains at all, but simply low, nondescript hills and bluffs. These ...

Book Review: The Rewind Files
This is KLCC. I'm Connie Bennett, Director of Eugene Public Library, with a book review of "The Rewind Files” by Claire Willett. “The Rewind Files,” a first novel by Portland playwright Claire Willett, is probably flying under your radar. It's out of ...

Suicide Squad Most Wanted Deadshot and Katana comic book review
Jack and Troy from ZiaComics.com talk about the upcoming comic book, Suicide Squad Most Wanted: Deadshot and Katana. The six-issue mini-series will showcase the popular characters of Deadshot and Katana, who both are members of the Suicide ...

'Front Lines' book review: A must-read WWII alternate history
Front Lines, the first book Michael Grant's new Soldier Girl series, follows these three ordinary young women as they fight for their country and for their lives. Just when you think their situations can't get any worse, they do. Everything just gets ...

In 'My Name Is Shylock,' Jacobson gives notorious character his say
A Man Booker Prize winner whose first book was about Shakespearean heroes and whose long career represents a sustained engagement with questions of Jewish identity, Jacobson is ideally suited to take on "Merchant," a play that Harold Bloom has ...

Book review: Shelf Life
The Kolkata-based illustrator spins an engaging yarn about a British paranormal expert, Sir Alec Morgan, who arrives in the Bengal capital to celebrate the launch of his latest book and to look for some local ghosts, armed with a tracking device that ...

Book review: Stranger Anxiety
The New Xenophobia is a breezy little book with one central thesis. Xenophobia has been part of the human condition, though as Khair points out, the stranger we fear is not just any stranger, but a particular kind of stranger. What he calls “Old ...

Book Review: The Go Programming Language
The first half of the book covers the basics of the Go programming language, including the format and Unicode encoding of source files, variables, value types along with structures, maps, arrays and slices. This half concludes with Go's approach to ...

Book review: This is Not That Dawn
The translator Rakhshanda Jaleel lays out very valuable context about the title of this book. When told of the problems encountered by the muhajirs or UP/Bihar migrants in Pakistan, General Ayub Khan had warned them against voting for the combined ...


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