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Book Reviews 04/2017

THE BOOK NOOK: Crossing 'The Bridge' between record albums and books
A group of fellows at my high school used to have a joyous weekly ritual. We scanned our music magazines with intense devotion. We knew which new records were due to be out. Then we would head out to the record shops to pick up the latest works of ...

Comic Book Review – Beast Wagon Finale
The double-sized finale of the critically acclaimed and British Comic Award nominated series by Owen Michael Johnson, John Pearson & Colin Bell goes on sale on the 1st April 2017. Make sure you mark the date as you don't want to miss this. It's sad to ...

Book review and giveaway winner!
We will be contacting your for your mailing address soon so we can send you your copy of this fantastic book. That is unfortunately all I have for this morning. I have a little bit of time here to sit and knit before I have to head out and do a ton of ...

Book Review: “The Brain Defense”, Kevin Davis
Davis discusses several aspects of the “brain defense” including its legal antecedants (the insanity plea), its modern manifestations, and special cases such as military veterans and sportsmen exposed to traumatic brain injuries (TBI). The bulk of the ...

Book Review: “All The Forever Things” by Jolene Perry
Reading All the Forever Things by Jolene Perry was like re-watching the movie Ghost World. The protagonist, Gabe, is so much like Enid and her best friend, Bree, has a lot in common with Rebecca. The only difference between All the Forever Things and ...

Books: Laila Lalami on being a writer, Jeff VanderMeer reviews 'American War' and more
As book editor, I'm supposed to be keeping up on the latest in literature, but I recently started reading “Anna Karenina” for the first time. And it's great! I think this Tolstoy kid could really go places. What's your favorite book published before ...

Book review: In "Hollywood Aesthetic," UNCW's Todd Berliner explains why movies give us pleasure
Writing movie reviews can be humbling. I can't help noticing that a lot of films I thought of as four-star aren't mentioned any more, while movies I thought were amusing trifles, like “Back to the Future” or “Dirty Dancing,” get replayed again and ...

Comic Book Review – Transformers: Till All Are One #8
This is it: the final stand for Cybertron! Will Starscream and Windblade's gamble finally pay off or will all of Iacon be destroyed by the zombie titans? The battle for Cybertron came to a head in Transformers: Till All Are One #8 and got a satisfying ...

Book Review: “Deep Country; Five Years in the Welsh Hills” by Neil Ansell
Few in the Western Hemisphere truly understand what it feels like to experience absolute darkness with a starry sky overhead and an impenetrable obscurity beneath. Though much of this rare earthly isolation is reserved for the remotest regions of the ...

Book Review: Personal tales, family gossip and the making of a superstar
Before rolling up my sleeves to jot down my thoughts regarding Khullam Khulla, Rishi Kapoor's autobiographical sketch, I think, I must mention, that my first Hindi film was Khel Khel Mein — the book's title floated from the buoyantly bubbly Khullam ...

Book review: Search is on for pieces of alien civilization in 'Sleeping Giants'
Rose Franklin is 11 when she falls to the bottom of a well and survives. When she is rescued, however, she discovers that what she had not fallen in was a well, but a buried, giant mechanical hand. This propels Franklin, who becomes a physicist as an ...

Book review: Devoted fans of Elton John will relish 'Captain Fantastic'
My sister is 10 years older than I am and, from my childhood perspective, had absolutely no redeeming qualities while we were growing up. She tied up the lone phone line in the house for hours and slept in on Christmas morning, which delayed the ...

Book review: Small details, compelling plot bring 'Twelve Lives' to life
It took more than two weeks for me to finish Hannah Tinti's ambitious new novel, “The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley.” I was so enthralled that I did not want the story to end. The story follows Samuel Hawley, a man with a criminal history, and his ...

Book review: Timing problems stall Eloisa James' 'Seven Minutes in Heaven'
As in the previous books in James' Desperate Duchesses by the Numbers series, "Seven Minutes in Heaven" features at least one character who appeared in the Desperate Duchesses series as a child. Eugenia Snowe — whose father is the eccentric hero of ...

Book review: 'We March Against England'
The vast majority of the book focuses on the early months of the war, particularly the spring and summer of 1940. Given that the German invasion of England never took place, Forczyk's book is heavy in conjecture. But unlike a jury asked to reach a ...

Book review: Was Roger Clemens railroaded?
The early part of the book focuses on Clemens and how he became the fearsome pitcher that dominated Major League Baseball for a majority of his career. Important in his development, both as a pitcher and a man, was the loss of his father and his mother ...

Book review: Stuart Woods delivers fast-paced action in latest Stone Barrington installment
Stuart Woods has always been a good author to depend on for a short journey to the land of the rich and famous. He has been churning out books so fast that I have not been able to keep up with him. I am pleased to say, coming back and reading this ...

Book review: "Throwback Special" explores every man's thoughts
“The Throwback Special” was a 2016 National Book Award finalist for fiction. The book is predicated on the National Football League play on Nov. 18, 1985, in which Washington Redskins quarterback Joe Theismann suffered a career-ending compound ...

Book review: Wine teller ventures into world of sommeliers
Some people shuffle paper for their jobs. Some sommeliers lick rocks, if they're desperate enough to want to know the difference between the taste of blue slate and red. They forgo brushing their teeth in the morning, or drinking hot beverages, or ...

Book review: Iles concludes riveting series on South, race, murder
In "Mississippi Blood," Greg Iles concludes one of the longest, most successfully sustained works of popular fiction in recent memory. His trilogy started in 2014. That year, three years after surviving a near-fatal auto accident, Iles published ...

Find Your Way Across This Misty, Mysterious 'Frontier'
Reading this book is like trying to solve a mystery in a dream. Like the Pleiades, it's best glimpsed without looking at it directly. Patterns recur, but to track them or expect them to lead to something is a mistake. (Imagine a Mirkwood where the only ...

BOOK REVIEW: 'Jack and Norman: A State-Raised Convict and the Legacy of Norman Mailer's “The Executi
I've not read “In the Belly of the Beast,” Jack Henry Abbott's book about his prison experiences and his half-baked commentary on Marxism and Communism, and I don't plan to. But I have read Norman Mailer's “The Executioner's Song,” which was one of the ...

Book review (Nonfiction): 'The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of 'Les Miserables' '
A biography of a book, rather than a person, is a relatively new wrinkle in nonfiction. When the approach succeeds, as it does with David Bellos' “The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of 'Les Misérables,' ” the result can be genuinely ...

BOOK REVIEW: Salem author's 'Indestructibles' series hits its stride
With book three, “The Entropy of Everything†(2015), and book four, “Like A Comet†(2016), the teenage heroes of the first two installments have moved well beyond the comic book tropes that bore them and blossomed into full-blown, ...

Read a crucial set of essays from the progenitor of “mansplaining”
So it is with Solnit's new book of collected essays, The Mother Of All Questions. A selection of her work from 2014 to 2016, the essays all have to do with feminism as it stands today. Solnit traces feminism—and history at large—to deftly bring us to ...

Book review: Understanding Isaiah made easier with 'The Vision of All'
Spencer's fascination with the ancient writings doesn't keep him from recognizing the difficulty of the content. His desire is to help the reader gain a better comprehension of the Isaiah chapters in the two books of Nephi in the Book of Mormon without ...

BOOK REVIEW: Communication is key to doctor-patient relationship
Your doctor took your vitals, looked in your mouth, felt around your jaw and thumped your back. He asked questions, you answered, got down from the table, got dressed and got your prescription. In and out in 15 minutes but what just happened? After ...

Book Review: 'Business Boutique—A Woman's Guide for Making Money Doing What She Loves'
In answer to what she describes as “a movement of women creating businesses… doing what they love,” business coach, speaker, and now author Christy Wright has put together a standout roadmap for success in her soon to be released book, “Business ...

Dying for Beginners by Charlie Courtauld, book review: I wanted to convey to you what a life-giving book this is
This has been a hard review to write. I knew Charlie Courtauld a bit. Our paths crossed. We both worked at the BBC and for The Independent on Sunday, at different, overlapping times. Now I wish I'd known him better. Which is probably the best kind of ...

Book Review: A new era dawns and it won't be human-friendly
LONDON, April 3, 2017 – Clive Hamilton's book Defiant Earth – the fate of humans in the Anthropocene is not for the faint-hearted. Basically, its thesis is that the Earth – and us along with it – is going down the tubes. Our rampant, irrational use of ...

BOOK REVIEW: 'Leo Durocher: Baseball's Prodigal Son'
But Mr. Dickson serves up a thoroughly researched, compellingly written book of a complex character, and also about the important part of American culture he helped change. He also ponders the very nature of celebrity and why we are so addicted to cult ...

Book Review – Angels of Music by Kim Newman
In Angels of Music, Kim Newman takes us into the murky underworld of the Paris, with the focal point the Paris Opera House. At the start, it almost feels like a “what if” the Phantom of the Opera ran his own agency of spies? The Phantom's spies all ...

Book Review 383: Barbarossa
Almost all Americans share a belief that our fathers and grandfathers fought a “good war” that eliminated fascism. It is a false belief as regards European fascism but half-true for Asia, where we defeated the fascists in Japan but supported them in ...

Book Review: Insane Clown President
How did America, and the world, end up with Donald Trump as President of the United States? It's a question that will likely be asked ad nauseam until the end of western democracy, which hopefully will survive a while longer yet. Matt Taibbi has ...

Book review: 'Cork Dork' celebrates wine, sommeliers
Sommelier is a simple yet mysterious job title. The most basic translation from the French might be wine expert, but then how exactly does one attain that status? Bianca Bosker decided to find out in "Cork Dork," a journey that reads like a wine lover ...

Book review: The Pirate Who Does Not Know the Value of Pi
Source: NYRBAn illustrated novel in verse, or a set of surreal poems that tell a (sort of) story, Eugene Ostashevsky's new book The Pirate Who Does Not Know the Value of Pi is a strange creation. It splices a contemporary world of Nokia phones and hip ...

Book review: Tech addiction tempts us all
How long do you think the average office email goes unread? Ten minutes, maybe? Wrong. The average time is six seconds, according to Adam Alter, whose book, Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked, was ...

'Foxlowe' Is A Delicious Slice Of Darkness
A young girl at the start of the book, Green has never known a life beyond Foxlowe. She lives in modern-day England, but she has no idea what that means; she's home-schooled and never allowed to leave Foxlowe. Instead, she's raised by a strict yet ...

Book review: In Extremis by Tim Parks has an extreme storyline
"I had come to a complete dead end, a position of utter impasse and ugliness." Thomas, the neurotic 50-something protagonist in the 18th novel from enduring English novelist Tim Parks, is pondering his life. It feels like a key moment. If you can ...

Book Review: Mary Astor's Purple Diary
As to why Sorel was obsessed and why he wrote this beautifully illustrated little book, Mary Astor's Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936, his answer is twofold. Accidental discovery of old newspapers about his beloved and admiration of ...

Book review: 'Warrior of the People' offers insight on cultural division
A new book offers a fresh perspective on the American West — through a woman's eyes. Through a strong narrative and extensive research, the reader sees one Native American woman's struggle to execute her life's purpose, serving as a America's first ...

Book review: 'Knit Noro Accessories 2'
Sixth & Spring books has released a new book of Noro accessories, and it has some stunning designs. "Knit Noro accessories 2" features 30 new projects from fingerless mitts and boot toppers to socks, hats, scarves, gloves with fingers, capelets, cowls ...

BOOK REVIEW: 'Traveling With Ghosts: A Memoir'
More than seven centuries ago the great medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri gave the classic description of the effect of loss on a human being: “Nessun maggior dolore/ Che ricordarsi del tempo felice/ Nella miseria,” which translates as “There is no ...

A Short Section In Neil Gorsuch's 2006 Book Appears To Be Copied From A Law Review Article
WASHINGTON — A short section in Judge Neil Gorsuch's 2006 book appears to copy — at times word-for-word — from a 1984 law review article by a lawyer in Indiana. Other sections of his book that were reviewed by BuzzFeed News contain additional ...

Book review: New kids books feature foxes, birds and chupacabras
There are tears at bedtime in this lovely picture book, but the mother bunny knows just how to fix them — with a hug, kiss and some rocking at the edge of the bed. In the end, Bunny falls asleep wearing a onesie, arms flung overhead, teddy bear upside ...

Book review: Experimental 'Madwoman' marks new directions for poetry in these times
Two diverse poets have new works: Shara McCallum's fifth book is markedly experimental, and Jane Satterfield's fourth is focused and sophisticated. The persona of “Madwoman's” contradictory conscience and memory strikes a dialogue with the poet's ...

Book review: Nixon was an enigma, but new bio shows him in his entirety
Decades before Donald Trump and Steve Bannon stormed the White House, it was Richard Nixon who complained to his aides, “Never forget, the press is the enemy. The press is the enemy. The press is the enemy. Write that on the blackboard 100 times and ...

Book Review: Wonder
August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid--but his new classmates can't get ...

Book review: Anne Perry provides satisfactory conclusion to series in 'Murder on the Serpentine'
In "Murder on the Serpentine" by Anne Perry, it is early summer 1899 and Thomas Pitt, head of the Special Branch, is summoned by Queen Victoria to her personal chambers where he is given the daunting task of investigating the death of one of the queen ...

Clutterfree With Kids (book review)
Joshua Becker, author and minimalism guru, argues for the many benefits of raising kids in an uncluttered, simplified space. The title of Joshua Becker's book, “Clutterfree with Kids,” sounds like an oxymoron. Kids and clutter go together like cookies ...


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