BooknByte.com: A website for book lovers

Home > Book Reviews

Book Reviews 03/2018

Book review: Classic murder mystery an exercise in deductive reasoning
In 2011, Agatha Christie was credited with being the most published author of all time by publisher Harper Collins. Wikipedia still gives her that credit. Most known of her works is “Murder on the Orient Express,” a classic murder mystery. As an ...

Book Review: The City of Brass by SA Chakraborty
At its best, the fantasy genre has always been about using the imagination to wrap our minds around the world we actually live in. That's what makes The City of Brass, a debut novel from S.A. Chakraborty, such a fascinating and worthwhile read. The ...

Basalt Library Book Review: 'Red Clocks' by Leni Zumas
Leni Zumas' novel Red Clocks takes place in a world quietly similar to our own, until the U.S. Congress ratifies a “Personhood Amendment,” nullifying Roe v. Wade and granting constitutional rights of life, liberty and property at conception. Abortions ...

A man and his son with special needs make their final days together count
Rare is the author who materializes from behind his novel to announce its purpose. But then everything about Jesse Ball's writing feels strange and exploratory. In the introduction to “Census,” his eighth novel, Ball says the story was inspired by his ...

Book review promises to entertain guests
During next Wednesday's Coffee Cup Brunch, Janice Pellam will give a book review on “My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry,” by Fredrik Backman. Pellam said she was moved by the first lines of the book: “Every seven-year-old deserves a ...

Comic Book Reviews for February 28, 2018
Since before I was hired by IGN four years ago, IGN Comics has published dozens of comic book reviews every week. We've weighed in on everything from the big events at Marvel and DC to exciting indie projects, utilizing a variety of reviewer voices who ...

The Library of Congress: 'The book Palace of the American People'
The nation's founders were readers. They relied on books to an extraordinary degree when creating a new government. Yet talk of a national library started only after the 1790 agreement to locate the nation's new capital in an unremarkable town on the ...

BOOK REVIEW: 'Truth about Alicia' shows human struggles
When I picked up Ana Consuelo Matiella's book “The Truth about Alicia,” I found a gem of a completely different kind than I was used to. I recommend this book of short stories to anyone wanting to step away from mainstream reading, or anyone interested ...

BOOK REVIEW: Controversial author offers border insight
Born and raised in the American Southwest to a Hispanic family, Cantú chronicles his time between 2008 and 2012 as a member of the United States Border Patrol, as well as his insights on what the present of Mexican-American border politics is and what ...

7 New Books We Recommend This Week
(Mad Creek/Ohio State University Press, paper, $21.95.) An American scholar visits classic sites of the ancient world in a book that's part travelogue, part memoir and part musing on our contested cultural heritage. “Vigderman approaches her subject ...

Andrew Lloyd Webber sings a happy tune in his memoir, 'Unmasked'
The book reads like dinner party tales: conquests, side stories and a few confessions. The tone? Puckish smile behind lifted wine glass. Inarguably, it's been a remarkable career. Starting with the 1971 American arena tour of “Jesus Christ Superstar ...

Book review: 'The Hush'
This cover image released by St. Martin's Press shows "The Hush," a novel by John Hart. (St. Martin's Press via AP). Series, or sequels to a novel, work because the stories have a continuity that invests the reader in the characters' next adventures ...

Antisocial Book Review
Imagine if someone from our school hacked into everyone's phone and uploaded everything on it from texts to Google search entries onto a website for everyone to see. Everyone's secrets to be outed, classmates dreading the moment their private lives are ...

BGN Comic Book Review: 'The Black Dahlias'
In difficult times, art can be a solace, and a place to examine justice and humanitarian issues. Comics have been a great source for these type of stories and as the cover for The Black Dahlias Issue Zero shows, they aim to tackle some serious issues ...

A sense of not belonging
Even better, though, is the fact that any young woman of Maya's age and circumstances can finally read a book in America where she, or someone like her, appears on its pages. The heroine isn't blonde, nor does she have a vampire for a boyfriend. What ...

Book review: Death Comes in Through the Kitchen
When American journalist Matt Sullivan arrives in Havana in the spring of 2003, he's carrying a second-hand wedding dress, a suitcase filled with pots, pans, cutlery and appliances, and the expectation that his Cuban girlfriend, Yarmi, whom he hasn't ...

Notes From the Book Review Archives
This week's cover reviews look at the roles optimism and progress play in the United States. In his 1960 review of Robert L. Heilbroner's “The Future as History,” Joseph Wood Krutch considered similar themes and wondered about the future's ...

Spinning a Brutal Off-the-Grid Childhood into a Gripping Memoir
Home schooling consisted of an occasional morning in the basement flipping through books, nothing more. “Learning in our family was entirely self-directed,” she writes in her memoir, “Educated,” which enters the hardcover nonfiction list at No. 3. “You ...

Book Review ~ Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff
We might be acutely averse to anything associated with fire in our particular area but one cannot ignore the number one, best selling non-fiction book in the nation, Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury. To begin with, it is a difficult book to review because ...

Can virtual reality make everything better?
[Book review: 'The Internet Is Not the Answer' by Andrew Keen]. “If the Internet is any guide to how VR will evolve,” he writes, “most people will not just become VR consumers but VR producers as well, the same way people blog, upload YouTube videos ...

Pitchers, playwrights, journalism and jazz in black Pittsburgh
(Given Wilson's prominence in “Smoketown,” the omission of another important black Pittsburgh writer born in the 1940s — John Edgar Wideman, whose books are set mostly in the city's Homewood section — is puzzling.) [“My Long Trip Home: A Family ...

Putting a face on the struggle for transgender rights
The book chronicles McBride's coming out, her activism and her marriage to Andrew Cray, a transgender lawyer at the Center for American Progress — and her loss of Cray to cancer just four days after the wedding ceremony. The couple were married in ...

A Marine's Inventive Memoir
In The New York Times Book Review, Mark Bowden reviews Matt Young's “Eat the Apple.” Bowden writes: Photo. The trouble with writing the unvarnished truth in a memoir is that it requires you to be hard not only on others, but also on yourself. Matt ...

Book review: Sequel takes readers on a ride through curses, magic and the '60s
Jet and Franny are the old and mysterious aunts from the original book. In “Practical Magic,” there is not much about them. There are hints at boys hit by lightning for love, magic and some fear from little girls and townspeople. However, in this book ...

Book review: From ghostly sheen to mysterious illnesses, 'Radium Girls' details untimely justice
While the Radium Girls' story is cinematically dramatic — Moore did begin to research it in earnest after directing a stage production of the same narrative — the book reads tediously. Besides too many characters with pieced-together accounts, there ...

Wholly, A Devotional to Hela: Book Review
Wholly: A Devotional for Hela (2012, Asphodel Press, 137 pages) is a very different kind of pagan book. It was written and edited by Dagain Madir with contributions from others, including Raven Kaldera. hela hel goddess norse viking underworld death ...

Book review: The Spiritual Nature of Animals
The Spiritual Nature of Animals by Dr. Karlene Stange, a longtime La Plata County veterinarian, has written a heavily and lovingly researched book about humans' best friends. During her 30-year practice of caring for animals, and by extension, their ...

'Last Son of the War God'; a book review
Seldom do I ever do book reviews. There is a cogent reason for that, being I don't (seldom if ever) read books, and especially not fiction. Why the exception you ask? Simple: I was approached by valiant members of our SF community with the prospect of ...

Book review: 'All the Beautiful Girls' a beautiful tale that tackles difficult topics
Elizabeth J. Church knows women. She very aptly portrays emotions and experiences through the main character in “All the Beautiful Girls.” Lily goes through some really dreadful times in her first 21 years. Some of them are even difficult to read about ...

Book review (nonfiction): 'Agatha Christie: A Mysterious Life'
This British stamp was released in 2016 to mark the centennial of the year in which Agatha Christie wrote her first published novel, “The Mysterious Affair at Styles.” It was released in 1920. Agatha Christie cover. prev. next. Facebook · Twitter ...

Book review: Brutal honesty of 'Surviving Jersey' gives reader hope
Perspective is the cornerstone of “Surviving Jersey: Danger & Insanity in the Garden State,” a new collection of essays from the widely published and anthologized author Scott Loring Sanders. Although Sanders grew up in New Jersey and now lives in ...

Book Review: The 'ideal woman' in an industrialized world
“Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women's Self-Defense Movement” by Wendy L. Rouse, 2017, New York University Press, 255 pages, $35. Wendy L. Rouse, an assistant professor with academic interests in the Progressive Era, introduces to the reader the ...

Book review: 'Only Child'
As his parents' relationship begins to fray – Zach calls their fights “thunderstorms” – Zach takes refuge in his brother's closet, in painting pictures of his feelings and in sitting “crisscross applesauce” as he reads books from Mary Pope Osborne's ...

Book review: 'Altogether Fitting and Proper'
Timothy B. Smith's informative book, “Altogether Fitting and Proper: Civil War Battlefield Preservation in History, Memory, and Policy, 1861-2015,” has very little to say about the racial struggles that have kept whites and blacks at odds during and ...

Book review: Class and conflict on a Maine island in 'We Shall Not All Sleep' by Estep Nagy
This is a novel in which characters grapple with impossible moral questions, and the repercussions of certain decisions can echo across the years. While the setting of “We Shall Not All Sleep” is idyllic, the human drama at the center of the novel is ...

Book review: Have our tribes become more important than our country?
Like Mark Lilla, in his recent book “The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics,” Chua decries American progressives' shift away from messages that appeal to shared values and toward themes that dwell on ever-narrowing group identities. The ...

The Maoist roots of China's economic rise explored in Red Swan – book review
Sebastian Heilmann brings what is, for English-speaking readers, a somewhat rare European – or in this case, German – perspective to “China's rise”. There are almost as many explanations for China's economic development as there are books on the ...

Oklahoman book review: 'Sisters Like Us' by Susan Mallery
I picked up Susan Mallery's new book, “Sisters Like Us,” expecting a fun, lighthearted, slice-of-life story about sisters like Mallery usually delivers. I didn't expect to be made to feel so uncomfortable by the subject matter — women judging women ...

Oklahoman book review: 'Subhuman' by Michael McBride
For the constant reader, story lines in genre fiction can quickly blur from one book to another. Mystery, fantasy, sci-fi, horror, romance, westerns — all have similarities and beats that are as comfortable as a pair of warm slippers but as expected ...

Book review: The scenery is what's remembered from 'The Hush'
The decade has been difficult for Johnny, who became a minor celebrity whose exploits with a killer were detailed in a true-crime book. But the 23-year-old now is a near hermit, whose infrequent visits to the small North Carolina town for supplies ...

Book review: Yellowstone is the backdrop for romance in 'Courting Carrie in Wonderland'
It's 1904, and Carrie McKay is working with Wylie Camping Company in Yellowstone for the summer while she's in between semesters at Montana Agricultural College in “Courting Carrie in Wonderland.” Sergeant Major Ramsay Stiles is a war veteran with a ...

Book review (fiction): Jojo Moyes charms readers again in new novel, 'Still Me'
In 2012, author Jojo Moyes introduced readers to delightful caregiver Louisa Clark in the best-selling novel “Me Before You,” followed by the sequel, “After You.” Moyes' latest installment continues the storyline across the pond in America, where ...

Book Review: 'The Line Becomes A River'
My book is about acknowledging that, it's about thinking through the ways we normalize violence and dehumanize migrants as individuals and as a society.” To be clear: during my years as a BP agent, I was complicit in perpetuating institutional violence ...

Book Review: 'Sales Won't Save Your Business' by Joe Pardo
In Sales Won't Save Your Business, "Super" Joe Pardo answers the questions business owners have about how to create a viable and successful business beyond just selling. The book's title is very apt because, as Joe points out, selling a lot of your ...

Book Review: 'The Deadly Ocean,' Ecological SF by Louis P. Kicha
An ecological s-f novel, Louis P. Kicha's self-published The Deadly Ocean looks at the deadly aftermath of an unplanned disastrous event spurred by the random bombardment of cosmic ray particles off the Florida Keys. When two divers, two years after ...

Book Review
In a rare deviation from my usual true crime book reviews, I want to talk about another favorite genre. I'm obsessed with White House reporters, particularly the original gangsta Helen Thomas. The legendary movie “All the President's Men” starring ...

Andrew Lloyd Webber, turning 70, looks back at smashing career in 'Unmasked'
As he approaches his 70th birthday on March 22, Andrew Lloyd Webber has decided the time is right to share some memories (sorry). And yes, the story behind Memory, from Cats, or at least Barbra Streisand's rendition of it, is one of the juicier tales ...

Book Review: Inventing a Space Mission
Where will science's next big advance arise? Like Archimedes, maybe someone will jump up out of a tub of hot water, shout 'Eureka' and direct everyone to use the next great discovery. Or maybe some science-bureaucrats will gather together via some on ...

Pinstripe Alley Book Review: “The Baby Bombers”
The Yankees took the league by storm last season, making a deep playoff run during a supposed rebuilding year. While the organization is no stranger to postseason success, the cast of characters in 2017 stood out as exciting, energetic, and much to the ...

Book review: Plenty of action but plot wanders in 'Caribbean Rim'
Randy Wayne White's 25th outing with Marion “Doc” Ford excels with the ongoing themes that have made this series popular among readers: Florida history and ecology. But increasingly the plots have taken a back seat to the Florida motifs, as is the case ...


here | link | local rentals



Home | Bookstores | Book Publishers | About Us | Search | Site Map

© Copyright by BooknByte.com. All rights reserved.